The Apple Watch can detect diabetes with an 85% accuracy

Sarah Buhr for TechCrunch:

According to Cardiogram founder Brandon Ballinger’s latest clinical study, the Apple Watch can detect diabetes in those previously diagnosed with the disease with an 85 percent accuracy.

The study is part of the larger DeepHeart study with Cardiogram and UCSF. This particular study used data from 14,000 Apple Watch users and was able to detect that 462 of them had diabetes by using the Watch’s heart rate sensor, the same type of sensor other fitness bands using Android Wear also integrate into their systems.

In 2015, the Framingham Heart Study showed that resting heart rate and heart rate variability significantly predicted incident diabetes and hypertension. This led to the impetus to use the Watch’s heart rate sensor to see if it could accurately detect a diabetic patient.

It’s studies like these that show that the Apple Watch has a massive future in monitoring individual health for the wearer like no other product has and the fact that you can respond to messages and notifications from your iPhone is secondary to this breakthrough device. Where has there ever been a mass-market device that monitors your health like this that more and more people are wearing from an everyday wearable accessory like your Watch? Fitbts are similar but not to the extent of the Apple Watch especially when it comes to how popular they are.

Jim Dalrymple’s HomePod Review

Jim Dalrymple:

I like this review from Jim, giving a personal use case of the HomePod with these tidbits:

Setting it up:

Apple is so good at giving us a quick and easy setup for devices and HomePod is no different.

When you plug in HomePod, you just need to hold your iPhone close to it and it will open a card asking if you want to set up the device.

Transfer your Accounts and Settings. This is your Siri preferences, Apple Music, Wi-Fi networks, etc.

And that’s it, HomePod is set up and ready to go. It took a couple of minutes, if that, and I was up and running.

On sound quality:

First and foremost, HomePod is a music speaker, and it excels at that task. I’ve compared HomePod to Sonos One, Google Max, and Amazon Echo to get a feeling for how each sounds in the same environment.

To be absolutely clear, there was no comparison in sound quality. HomePod offered so much more quality that it was quite literally laughable to hear the others. The only speaker that sounded decent was the Sonos One, but even it couldn’t compete with HomePod.

And this:

One of the other songs that I tested HomePod with was “Demons” by Jasmine Thompson. This is just her and a piano, so there isn’t a lot of bass, but there is a lot of treble, mids, and detail in her voice that HomePod could screw up.

It didn’t.

You could hear her breathe between lyrics. Everything was very clear and warm, which is critical for such a soft, meaningful song.

Personal music:

One thing about having multiple people access the HomePod that bothered me was that it would affect my “For You” section in Apple Music.

When you love songs, play songs and add songs to your library, Apple Music will suggest similar music, assuming that is what you want. If someone else, or a group of people come over and start playing genres you don’t like, it would screw everything up.

Well, it turns out I didn’t have to worry about that after all. There is a setting in the Home app that allows you to prevent the music played on HomePod from affecting the “For You” section of Apple Music.

On the microphones:

With Megadeth playing at 80 percent volume on HomePod (Yes, that’s loud), I stood 20-25 feet away and said “Hey Siri,” in a normal speaking voice. I expected no response. However, the music immediately lowers and Siri was ready for me to ask a question or give it an instruction.

Siri on which device:

If you have a number of different devices in the same room, you may wonder which Siri will respond to your request. For example, you set up a new HomePod, you’re wearing an Apple Watch, an iPad is on the table, and your iPhone is in your pocket.

Then you say, “Hey Siri.”

This is one of the really smart things that happens that we expect Apple to be able to figure out, and they did.

Siri polls all of your devices over Bluetooth to figure out which device should handle your request. Everything being equal, HomePod will respond. However, the system is smart enough to know if HomePod or another device should answer.

For instance, if you raise your wrist and say, “Hey Siri,” the combined devices will assume you want Siri on your Apple Watch. If you’re using your iPhone, then you probably want that device to respond. If you’re just sitting, not touching any device, then HomePod will take over.

That is very smart.