The Apple Watch can detect diabetes with an 85% accuracy

Sarah Buhr for TechCrunch:

According to Cardiogram founder Brandon Ballinger’s latest clinical study, the Apple Watch can detect diabetes in those previously diagnosed with the disease with an 85 percent accuracy.

The study is part of the larger DeepHeart study with Cardiogram and UCSF. This particular study used data from 14,000 Apple Watch users and was able to detect that 462 of them had diabetes by using the Watch’s heart rate sensor, the same type of sensor other fitness bands using Android Wear also integrate into their systems.

In 2015, the Framingham Heart Study showed that resting heart rate and heart rate variability significantly predicted incident diabetes and hypertension. This led to the impetus to use the Watch’s heart rate sensor to see if it could accurately detect a diabetic patient.

It’s studies like these that show that the Apple Watch has a massive future in monitoring individual health for the wearer like no other product has and the fact that you can respond to messages and notifications from your iPhone is secondary to this breakthrough device. Where has there ever been a mass-market device that monitors your health like this that more and more people are wearing from an everyday wearable accessory like your Watch? Fitbts are similar but not to the extent of the Apple Watch especially when it comes to how popular they are.

How to save podcasts Apple Watch playback

How to save podcasts from Overcast to MiniCast for Apple Watch playback – The Sweet Setup:

It works with apps like Overcast to be able to share certain podcast episodes straight to your watch for offline playback away from your iPhone.

Until Apple officially supports integration for podcast playback, this appears to be the best way to get podcasts on the Apple Watch.

Ben Brooks on the Apple Watch

Ben Brooks on the Apple Watch — The Brooks Review:

I use and check my phone a lot less than before. In fact, 90% of the time my iPhone is on silent (silent on my iPhone doesn’t vibrate anymore) and I don’t touch my phone much during the work day, or play time with the kids. My iPhone has stopped making noise. My watch doesn’t make noise either, it just taps my wrist. Neither bug other people, or alert others that something is alerting me.

I could be getting a call in a library and no one would know. I could respond to a text on my wrist so fast, it will hardly interrupt us. The Apple Watch, for me, has become the most perfect device for staying the fuck out of my way.

But even more than that, it’s better than anything else at getting my attention.

Tap, tap.

Erin texted.

I got it — even though I’m mowing the lawn, and typically I always miss those texts because I can’t hear or feel my iPhone, I got the message. That’s powerful, and yet no one else heard or noticed I got a text.

I always get my messages with the Watch, and I never bother another soul getting them, and I think that’s a real solution, to a real problem, of the beeps, bops, and pongs of smartphones.

Apple releases Apple Watch update with Watch OS 1.0.1

Zac Hall for 9to5Mac:

Apple has released the first software update for Apple Watch today with the release of Watch OS 1.0.1. The update is available through the Apple Watch app on iPhone.

The update measures in at 51.6 MB and includes “performance improvements and bug fixes” as Apple notes. In addition to adding support for the 300+ new Emoji characters added in iOS 8.3 and OS X 10.10.3,  Apple lists these as improvements areas:

Siri

Measuring stand activity

Calculating calories for indoor cycling and rowing workouts

Distance and pace during outdoor walk and run workouts

Accessibility

Third party apps

Apple has also added language support Brazilian Portuguese, Danish, Dutch, Swedish, Russian, Thai, and Turkish.

Marco Arment on Redesigning Overcast’s Apple Watch app

Marco Arment:

I had also initially underestimated glances, which are very important in practice. Going out to the honeycomb app screen to launch apps is cumbersome — it’s much more compelling to keep a small number of glances, using them (and complications, which I really want third-party access to) as status updates and quick app-launching shortcuts.

Fantastic and fast rethinking from Marco on how apps should be optimised for the Apple Watch. Hopefully, Apple will allow developers access to the complications at the upcoming WWDC.

M.G. Siegler on Apple Watch Complementing the iPhone

M.G. Siegler:

I had a rough first 24 hours with the Apple Watch. It was seemingly one frustration after another. Then I realized I was trying to use the thing as I would my iPhone. And that’s simply not what this device is. It’s not an iPhone replacement, it’s 100 percent a complement. Which is why some of the initial backlash that you wouldn’t be able to use the device without your iPhone was not only misguided — it was completely backwards.

Calibrate Apple Watch to Improve Accuracy of Excercise Data

Jordan Khan for 9to5Mac:

By initiating the calibration process, you can get more accurate readings for calorie, distance, Move, and Exercise estimations in the Watch’s Activity app, and also improved calculations in the Workout app.

By following the steps below, you’ll start calibrating the device’s accelerometer and improve Apple Watch’s accuracy by allowing it to learn your personal stride patterns at various speeds:

  1. Bring your iPhone and your Apple Watch.
  2. Find an open, flat area outside that offers good GPS reception and clear skies.
  3. Make sure that Location Services is on. To check the setting on your iPhone, tap Settings > Privacy > Location Services.

  4. Make sure that Motion Calibration & Distance is on. To check the setting on your iPhone, tap Settings > Privacy > Location Services > System Services.

  5. Hold your iPhone in your hand, or attach it to your body with an armband (preferably) or waistband.

I’ve also heard that the first time you wanna go running or work out, take the iPhone with you for the first couple of times so it can calibrate and learn your step pattern. After the first couple of times of taking both devices with you whilst exercising you can then leave your iPhone at home, knowing that the Apple Watch will correctly record your workout data and sync the data back to the iPhone when you have finished.