iOS TV App Poised to Be Launching Soon in UK

Benjamin Mayo for 9to5Mac:

As of right now, the TV app is not available – when it rolls out, it will replace the Videos app on iPhone and iPad, in addition to appearing on Apple TV. The TV app integrates movies and TV shows from a variety of sources into one application with discovery, watch queues and other features.

At the iPhone X September media event, Eddy Cue said the TV app would roll out to the UK before the end of the year. He also promised that other major UK channels would add support for Apple TV with video-on-demand apps, including the ITV Hub and My5.

With Amazon’s Prime Video App being released for Apple TV yesterday, it looks like all the promised services and apps are coming together on all the Apple platforms and for UK customers just in time for the end of the year.

iPhone Slowing Down After Recent Upgrade

A New Phone Comes Out. Yours Slows Down. A Conspiracy? No. – The New York Times:

It happens every year: Apple releases new iPhones, and then hordes of people groan about their older iPhones slowing to a crawl.

Just look at the recent data. Between September and early November — when Apple made the iPhone 8 available, followed by the iPhone X — Google searches for the keywords “iPhone slow” jumped about 50 percent.

The phenomenon of perceived slowdowns is so widespread that many believe tech companies intentionally cripple smartphones and computers to ensure that people buy new ones every few years. Conspiracy theorists call it planned obsolescence.

That’s a myth. While slowdowns happen, they take place for a far less nefarious reason. That reason is a software upgrade.

Let’s say, for example, you have an iPhone 6 with 100 apps installed, four email accounts and 2,000 photos. It is more likely that a quality-assurance engineer tested installing a new operating system on a blank iPhone 6, rather than an iPhone 6 with the same setup as yours.

So if you want to minimize the chances of something going awry, resist the easy update path and opt for a clean install. For smartphones, I recommend backing up your data to your computer. For computers, you could back up your data to an online service or a portable drive. After the operating system installation is complete, you can then safely restore your data and apps to the device from the backup.

Here’s something many people don’t realize: Just because your iPhone or Samsung phone has 64 gigabytes of storage doesn’t mean you should fill it all the way up. The device will generally run faster if more of its storage is available.

I also recommend freeing up a huge amount of space by managing your photo library in the cloud. You can upload all your albums to a service like Google Photos and periodically purge all the images from the device itself. I did this recently on my iPhone 7 that was nearly full and seemed to be slowing down; purging the photos freed up about 50 gigabytes of data, and the iPhone feels as good as new.

Some great points here. Try it – if you feel like your iPhone is slowing down, make sure you have an up to date iCloud backup, then wipe the iPhone and put a fresh install of the operating system on your iPhone before restoring all your data.

Microsoft Apps – A Better Experience on iOS

Paul Thurrott:

Long story short, iPhone is a great platform for apps, as we all know. But it’s also a great platform for Microsoft apps—it’s arguably the best mobile platform for Microsoft apps—as well. And that makes it a lot more interesting. And a lot more useful.

It is surprising that you get a better experience of Microsoft’s own apps on iOS but that could lend the possibility to not just the popularity, but the ease of development due to software constraints and fragmentation on other developing platforms. With Google not exactly supporting Windows Phone anymore, it would appear Microsoft supporting Android is due to necessity. Even with Microsoft being the 3rd in the top players, they still maintain their class of putting users first – would Google do the same in their position? I doubt it.

App Store Changes ‘Free’ Button to ‘Get’

Zac Hall Reporting for 9to5Mac:

Apple has introduced a small but interesting tweak to the way it markets apps on the App Store. As you can see in the screenshot above, non-paid apps are now presented with the word ‘GET’ rather than ‘FREE’. While the reason for the change in how Apple is presenting non-paid apps isn’t clear, it’s likely due to the popularity of ‘freemium’ apps and in-app purchases, something that has been the source of controversy for Apple in the past…

Apple has taken a great deal of flack from customers and consumer protection groups through the years over apps marketed as free that push in-app purchases. The freemium model has been used in some cases to circumvent the lack of app trials on the App Store. For example, a developer may make an app free to download, but require an in-app purchase to unlock the app’s full functionality. The new ‘Get’ labels seem to address such a use case where previously ‘Free’ could be misleading.

I am not sure ‘Get’ is the right term to use here and maybe ‘download’ isn’t the right term either due to it already being used for your previously purchased apps but I certainly like it better than ‘Get’. I’d bet this term will get changed again in the near future.

Apple to Bundle Beats Music With iOS Early Next Year

Via 9to5Mac:

Apple will bundle the subscription music service it acquired from Beats into its iOS operating system early next year, instantly making it available on hundreds of millions of iPhones and iPads – and ramping up pressure on Spotify, the market leader in music streaming.

This seems pretty plausible especially as Jim Darlymple over at The Loop more or less confirmed it. Whether it will be a seperate app from iTunes is not clear at this point but one step at a time eh?

‘Masque attack’ on iOS

 

‘Masque attack’: Don’t panic but do pay attention | iMore:

“Masque Attack” is the new name—given by security firm FireEye—to an old trick intended to fool you into installing malicious apps on your iPhone or iPad. Most recently detailed by security researcher Jonathan Zdziarski, tricks like Masque Attack won’t affect most people, but it’s worth understanding how it works and, in the event you are targeted, how to avoid it.

To avoid Masque and similar attacks, all that’s required is to avoid downloading any apps from outside Apple’s official App Store, and denying permission for any untrusted app to install.

If you are concerned about being susceptible to attacks, then don’t jail break your device and only download apps direct from the App Store. Most consumer users probably won’t know how to install 3rd party apps anyway but it was worth noting for when people see a negative headline and are concerned.